Why Spain is perfect for first time TEFL travellers

I wouldn’t have taught TEFL in Spain for almost seven years if I didn’t think it was a great place to live. I’ve had my moments when I’ve wanted to jump on the nearest ferry to Morocco for an adventure, or swim back to England to escape the blistering heat, but Spain is a great destination for first time TEFL travelers. (This post is as seen on the i-to-i TEFL Blog.)
Life in the classroom
Spanish kids and teenagers are not the best behaved in the world. They can be pretty chulo – cocky – and it might take you a while to get your classroom management up to scratch, but once you get to know them they are a decent bunch.
The Youngsters
I live and teach English as a foreign language in Seville, in the south of Spain, and I’m in my sixth term with the same academy. So yes, I do love my job. Normal hours are from 4pm to 10pm, Monday to Thursday, where I teach kids and teenagers. This year I have 90 students spread across 8 different classes. That’s a lot of Marias and Pablos to remember, and plenty of reports to write after the exams, but I like the working environment of an academy. (Photo of a valley in Cazalla de la Sierra)

We prepare students for the Cambridge Certificates: KET, PET, FCE, and CAE, which helps get into University or find a job. Demand for English is high and business is booming. It’s great seeing the kids grow up through the years. I’ve got some 18 year-old students that I’m preparing for the PRE First Certificate at the moment. I first taught them when they were 13. Helping them achieve their goals brings great job satisfaction.
Despite following a syllabus, we have freedom in the class. We use ebeam whiteboard technology, which is great for creating dynamic and interactive classes. The kids love getting involved and over time it has become a necessary tool in my working life. I love showing funny youtube clips and getting students to answer follow up questions. I also use funny photos of their favourite pop stars or actors and take the mick in class. I have one group who love (and hate) Justin Beibel, who I call Justin Beaver. A photo of Justin’s head attached to a beaver’s body went down quite well, with most of the class.
The Adults
Times are hard in Spain and the standard TEFL wages of between €1,000 and €1,200 is enough to get by, but I do extra business classes in the morning to bump up my pay packet. Teaching adults can be more chilled, mainly because you’re not constantly telling them to stop checking wassup on their blackberry. (Photo of sunset over Granada)
Adults are generally keen to learn and have a fun sense of humour. Conversation classes are popular and they love being corrected. I’ve banned talk on the current economic crisis though; a bit depressing first thing in the morning. I’ve had a few ‘dry’ groups over the years where classes tend to float by like a slow boat on the river Mekong. You would have thought that every Spanish person has loads to talk about, but sometimes getting them to speak is una lucha – a struggle.
If you’re a first time TEFLer, beware. You need to be shit hot on your grammar. Spanish adults want to know ‘why’ for everything. My first two years were a nightmare; I always thought I was prepared, but Jose or Carmen would normally find that extra question that I didn’t have the answer to. “Err, I don’t know actually, I’ll tell you next class,” would be my typical answer. Make sure you do though, because they have excellent memories.
Life in the real world
Let’s be honest; TEFL in Spain is great because you get a lot of free time. You tend to teach between 20 and 24 contact hours, with a few more for planning, so you have time to live.
In Seville we get over 300 days of sun a year. When it rains, it absolutely chucks it down for a couple of days (or a couple of months which is did two years ago), but in general you can plan trips away at the weekend without worrying about the weather. Saying that, it rained on my wedding day last September and it NEVER rains in September. (Photo of moat in Seville)
Each region of Spain has its own culture and list of things to do. I’d recommend researching before you choose a destination. I picked Seville because I wanted to be in largish city near the beach, which ruled out Madrid, and learn Castellano, which ruled out Barcelona. Learning Spanish is a great feeling. After 6 years I’m pretty good; my pronunciation is still crap because I can’t roll my r’s, but I’m almost fluent reading and listening.
One great aspect of living in Seville is the places to visit in Andalucia. You have fantastic beaches in the south near Cadiz, historical cities to explore like Cordoba, pretty paths to walk along in the countryside in Aracena, mountains to ski down in the Sierra Nevada in Granada, flamenco shows to watch while drinking sherry in Jerez, and if you fancy it then crazy nights out to be had with the drunk Brits on the Costa del Sol.
Don’t forget the public holidays. Two weeks at Christmas, a week during Semana Santa at Easter, Ferias – fairs, and random bank holidays spread through the year. Spanish aren’t lazy, most work damn hard, but they do appreciate a good day off.
You never know, you might meet your future couple like I did. My wife used to be my student. I’ve got a dog too, her name is Pepa and she loves walking by the beach.
So life as a TEFL teacher is pretty good in Spain. Are you thinking of going to Spain? Which destination grabs you most? I’d be happy to answer any questions if you want to leave a comment. Suerte.
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Author: Barry O'Leary

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25 Comments

  1. Hi Baz

    I am looking for a bit of advice and was delighted to find your blog which is very helpful. I hope you don't mind if I give a bit of my background and ask some questions?

    I want to move to Spain permanently to be with my family and need to find a route to do so. (I was brought up in Britain and am currently learning Spanish.) Apart from my full time jobs, I have taught music/dance both on a one to one basis and to classes of differing ages in the past on a part time basis over a period of years, and have greatly enjoyed teaching. I had considered TEFL to be perhaps a gap year thing so not pursued it, but you are obviously making a fairly long term living out of it which I find encouraging. You are in a different age bracket than me however, so I wondered if you think it was possible/practical for someone in their 40s to move to Spain and teach on a permanent basis?

    How easy is it to find work (I think I saw you say somewhere that you have found your own work rather than use agencies), and how do you go about doing this? Once you are there is it possible to make good contacts so than when I am more fluent in Spanish and hopefully the economic climate improves it may be possible to apply for non teaching jobs too if I so wish?

    When you quote 1,000 – 1,200 Euros is that before tax and, if so, what approximately is left from that after the tax man has taken his share? Can you give a little advice on pros and cons of working in Seville, Madrid and Barcelona as those are the cities I would consider working in? ( I know you mention in your blog a little but eg. could I get by in Barcelona with Castellano or would I have to learn Catalan too.) How do you find working 4pm – 10pm as it is a very different working day from the British 9am – 5pm? Is it easy to make Spanish friends there or do you feel like an outsider?

    Finally, you have a CELTA, I have been looking at doing a TEFL. Would this still be fine for teaching or would it make me less attractive to an employer than someone with a CELTA? I have other experience which an academy may (or may not) find of benefit. I have studied 4 other languages although I can't pretend to be fluent in them so I have good basic language skills, and I have a business background – the latter may be attractive for classes for business people? I don't know. Another thing is if you have done an online course rather than a classroom based/partially classroom based course, do employers consider this a less valid course?

    I hope you don't mind so many questions. It would be a big, and hopefully permanent, move for me so I have to be well informed. I love your dog by the way. I was in Calpe near Alicante the year before last and saw people walking their dogs at the beach in the evening. It looked blissful!

    Thank you for reading my message.
    Carol

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  2. Hi Carol,

    Glad you found my site useful and really appreciate your comments. Great to see that you are thinking about coming out to Spain. It's tough over here at the moment but the TEFL industry is still booming as long as you can find an established academy to work for. It's definitely possible for someone in their 40's to move to Spain and teach on a permanent basis. In my academy we have teachers in their 40's and 50's, some married with children and they do pretty well. Quite a few have been here for some time and are settled so I don't think age matters.

    Finding a job in Spain can be tricky. If you're serious then you need a CELTA qualification as most schools require this, you could even do it here and find contacts in the meantime. It also depends on when you arrive, the most popular time is early September just before term, but there are moments during the year such as after Christmas and Easter when vacancies may arise. Best way is to pick a city, go round with your CV or email the Director of Studies and keep phoning until they say there are no jobs. Keep a list though because the academy who I'm working for now at first said no, but after one year I had another interview and they decided I'd matured (a bit).

    With regards to non-teaching jobs, I don't know anyone who is not a teacher, but then again Seville is small compared to Madrid and Barcelona where there must be jobs for bilingual speakers in companies.

    1,000 -1,200 is after tax, well it is where I work. I'm paying about 15% tax at the moment but that varies depending on how much the government feel like taking, bit of a sore point.

    Pros of Seville are the relaxed atmosphere, great hub for travelling, 300 days sun a year, plenty of festivals, quite cheap. Cons narrow minded locals, can get claustrophobic, not loads to do compared to the big cities.

    Pros of Madrid and Barca are more things to do, great night life and varied culture, more job opportunities, plenty of expats living, and of course the beach in Barca. Cons: expensive, might have to work in various spots round the city during the day, pollution, hectic, I think it would be difficult to live comfortably on a TEFL teacher's wage.

    You can get away with only Castellano in Barca apparently, but that was one of the reasons I didn't go there. I like the 4 to 10 timetable because I am more awake in the mornings and use more energy for my writing. In the summer it's more difficult though as you miss the warm evenings by the river. If you have kids then it can be hard as you may not see them much, but the weekends are all yours. I haven't made a great deal of Spanish friends, I did in my first 2 years, but they can be cliquey in Seville. I could make a lot more effort though and a lot of my colleagues have Spanish friends so it's up to you, they're a good bunch, most of the time!

    I think if you're up for learning Spanish, are interested in history and culture and are happy to live quite simple then TEFL in Spain is a great move. After travelling the world Spain's not the most exciting place in the world, but it's safe and you can live healthily.

    To be honest I'd go with a CELTA; they are the most recognised in the main schools. A TEFL is good to get an insight but I don't think they will get you as far. Saying that if you have other qualities like a good business background then that could benefit you and I know teachers who have done well without a CELTA. If you have the choice then I'd go with a classroom based course but more for your benefit to see if you enjoy it. I know you have taught music but it might be different (not sure why).

    It's been a pleasure to answer your questions. Hope that helps, be interested to know how you get on.

    Good luck

    Baz

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  3. Hi Baz

    That is very helpful and great to know that a permanent move is possible. I will look into CELTA courses and teaching institutions now.

    It may take a few months until I can move, but I will certainly let you know how it goes.

    Many thanks for your time and help – it is greatly appreciated!

    Carol

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  4. Hi Barry,

    Really enjoyed reading your blog posts, I have just completed a 20 hour TEFL course but still have 100 hours to go and I would like to come out to Spain in September to teach for a year. Do you think this would ne enough certification? i see you have mentioned CELTA but as I am only looking to work for a year to get a taste for travelling I don't know if i will need anything more. I have found an academy in Albacete that is currently advertising vacancies on the tefl scotland website, have you ever visited that city? I am 23 and quite like that it is a university city – plenty of nightlife at the weekends! Do you have any advice for finding accommodation if you are coming to Spain with a job already lined up? I can't afford to come out to live without having a job lined up as my wage in Scotland is minimum (i'm a psychology graduate turned waitress).

    Thanks for any help you can give me!

    Amy x

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  5. Hi Amy,

    Thanks for the comment. Glad to be of help. So you're thinking of sunny Spain, great choice. Re your course, it's good that you're doing something to get an insight. Is there any way you can do a CELTA? What is stopping you, money or time? I'd recommend doing a CELTA, but if you're only up for doing it for a year and can get away with it then fine. What sort of experience does the job in Albacete ask for? I haven't been there but it seems nice after a look on wikipedia. If you're up for a university town have you looked at Salamanca? It's bigger than Albacete and there might be more jobs? Depends what you're after though? Albacete would be nearer the beaches. The only thing with a small city is that if you don't have a job sorted beforehand then you have less opportunities. If you don't find a job then I'd go to a bigger city and try to get something on arrival.

    To get accommodation before then try these websites: http://www.mundoanuncio.com/, http://www.enalquiler.com/, http://www.easypiso.com/Piso-Compartido-Estudiantes. However, if you get there at the end of August then you'll find lots of advertisements in internet cafes, or even in the street on lamp posts and on notice boards. The school might be able to help too.

    If you can save up about 1,000 euros before you come then you could live for a month or two while you find work…

    Hope that helps.

    Baz

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  6. Hi Baz, first of all I want to congratulate you on your blog. It's fantastic and I will make sure to follow you more frequently. I came across your blog via your post on the i-i tefl website, since I'm currently enrolled in their online TEFL course. Reading your exchange on this site regarding the TEFL versus CELTA discussion, I'm very confused right now as this is one of my hot topics at the moment. Everyone in Barcelona (fellow teachers – mainly british) tells me that TEFL and CELTA are the same. As I want to follow up with a classroom course this summer before heading abroad, I would love to get some feedback from you. I'm fortunate at the moment as I am teaching at the same time while taking the online course, which helps me focus on the most important points in grammar. I have been thinking about teaching for some time already as I have been very burned out from the corporate world. Even so I could very easily teach Business English, I enjoy the challenge of teaching to young learners and teenagers. My time in Spain (Barcelona) is coming to an end after nearly 8 years, so teaching is a wonderful way to bridge any gap year in between. I'm not sure whether I want to return to the business world, as I have spend 12 very stressful years in it and only now I have found satisfaction in what I do while teaching. While reading your blog, I have seen quite a few similarities regarding the desire to travel and to write. It's time for some change….

    Would love to get some feedback regarding the TEFL – CELTA course, as I want to make the right decision soon.

    Thanks for everything!!! Would love to hear more from you.

    Sunny Greetings from Barcelona,

    Madeleine

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  7. Hi Madeleine,

    Sorry for the late reply, been a manic week. Thanks for your comment, it's good to hear some feedback and nice to know I've helped. When you say TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) and CELTA, do you mean the TESOL (Teaching English to speakers of other languages)? I'm presuming you mean TESOL.

    I'd agree that TESOL and CELTA are pretty much the same. They are both recognised qualifications and the courses have the same content. The only thing is that it seems like the CELTA is a bit more recognised, since it's Cambridge, and they are the Don in the world of TEFL! If you have to chose then I'd go with the CELTA.

    12 years in business is a long time and a change is always good. Why do you have to leave Barcelona though, and what do you write about?

    Hope that helps, let me know.

    Cheers

    Baz

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  8. Hi Baz,

    I'd like to agree with the others about your blog, it was a comfort for me to read as I start to prepare (mentally anyway!) for my first teaching job in Spain. I have just accepted a job with a language school in a small-ish city south of Madrid.

    I did my CELTA ten years ago and then followed a career in journalism until September last year when I packed it in and embarked on a ten month Asian backpacking trip. I kept a travel blog as a means to keeping my writing going but when I got back I decided I no longer wanted the doom and gloom of journalism in my life!

    So I thought, I know, I will dust off my CELTA certificate and go and do something I've always wanted to do – learn Spanish and live and work in a different country.

    I suppose my main concern (getting there eventually!) is classroom management. I noticed that you wrote about the youngsters being cocky at times and I was wondering if you have any tips for keeping the attention of teenagers and smaller children. I only really have experience of teaching adults and am a little apprehensive about teaching the younger ones. I'm sure I'll be fine but it would be really useful if you could share anything that would make my life a bit easier until I find my feet!

    I'm looking forward to my year in Spain – but obviously feeling a bit nervous too.

    Keep blogging – you're clearly helping lots and lots of people – so thank you!

    Liz.

    Post a Reply
  9. Hey Liz,

    Thanks for writing, good to see you've dusted off your CELTA, welcome back.

    Re classroom management, it's a tricky subject and everyone has their own style. I think the first two weeks are vital, I normally go in quite hard with the teenagers, probably send out at least one or two students in the first week, just to show them who's boss.

    A good way of getting on their level is to spend some time in the first week finding out what they like, songs, actors, what programmes they watch, what they like to do outside class, so you can use this as 'bait' in your lessons by involving their likes. If you have white board technology then you can try to incorporate images of their favourites into the lesson. I have a red and yellow card system for class too. It's mainly for homework, no homework is a straight red, 3 reds in the 1st term then I tell them I'll speak to their parents; I've never had to. A lot of teachers use points for everything but I find that gets too competitive and after a while it loses it's appeal, plus it's hard work. For teenagers it's more important what the other students think of them so bare that in mind.

    With the younger learners you have to get on their wavelength, again find out what they like and use it to your advantage. Their attention span is shorter so quick activities are better and they like a lot of encouragement because they just want to please the teacher. Smiley faces are good.

    Hope that helps, am sure you'll be fine. Any other q's then just drop me a comment.

    Good luck.

    Baz

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  10. Hi Baz

    I am interested in teaching in Spain, but I have read online that its is a nightmare to get a work visa, so most ppl stay illegally on a tourist visa but risk getting fined/baned from EU. How was your experience?

    Thank you
    Steph

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  11. Hi Steph,

    Thanks for the comment, where are you from? North America somewhere? I'm British so I had no problems with the visas, but I have worked in other countries illegally and it was a bit of a pain because you had to keep leaving and coming back. If you tell me more about you maybe I can help, it depends which country you're from. I know a few Americans who have visas here but they have been sponsored by the schools.

    Let me know

    Baz

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  12. Hi. Thank you for responding. I live in the US. Based on what Ive read online, most schools dont want to go through hassle of sponsoring work visas so you get paid cash. Is that true? With EU tourist visa, youre supposed to leave EU for 90 days before you can come back. In your opinion, which country was the easiest to move to?

    Thank you
    Steph

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  13. Hi Barry!

    I hope you are reading this happy and well 🙂

    I'm English and doing my TEFL at the moment. I recently lived in Egypt for 18 months, and I am going back there on 18th October to stay for a while (money and seeing how things go there dependent) and then my plan is to move to Spain with the dog, and put down some roots.

    I noticed that you have a dog in one of the pictures, which is great, as working her in to my plans makes things a little more complicated, and you will understand!

    The situation I want in Spain is to be near mountains, sea, countryside, and also a teaching job. Ideally I would like to live in the countryside (ie nature, not built up, and close to the sea), but have easy access to somewhere more built up for work and for when I want to go in…

    I spent about 6 months last year around Granada/alpujarras and although I liked it, I don't at the moment feel drawn to living there. Although I wonder if the moutains are available elsewhere!

    I have a yoga background, and eating from the land is important to me (i like the abundance of food growing all around in andalucia!) and I had thought that perhaps starting off my move to Spain with staying with dog friendly woofing/help exchange (hope you know this) families would be a lifestyle i would enjoy, and allow me to explore new areas before starting up the english teaching.

    My guess is that I would be making the move from Egypt early in the new year, which presumably would make it harder to get jobs.

    If you have any suggestions of areas or anything else, or dog friendly living situations that go with teaching english, I would love to hear from you as it would help my confidence about the move!!!!!

    Thank you Barry,
    Amy 🙂

    Post a Reply
  14. Hi Barry!

    I hope you are reading this happy and well 🙂

    I'm English and doing my TEFL at the moment. I recently lived in Egypt for 18 months, and I am going back there on 18th October to stay for a while (money and seeing how things go there dependent) and then my plan is to move to Spain with the dog, and put down some roots.

    I noticed that you have a dog in one of the pictures, which is great, as working her in to my plans makes things a little more complicated, and you will understand!

    The situation I want in Spain is to be near mountains, sea, countryside, and also a teaching job. Ideally I would like to live in the countryside (ie nature, not built up, and close to the sea), but have easy access to somewhere more built up for work and for when I want to go in…

    I spent about 6 months last year around Granada/alpujarras and although I liked it, I don't at the moment feel drawn to living there. Although I wonder if the moutains are available elsewhere!

    I have a yoga background, and eating from the land is important to me (i like the abundance of food growing all around in andalucia!) and I had thought that perhaps starting off my move to Spain with staying with dog friendly woofing/help exchange (hope you know this) families would be a lifestyle i would enjoy, and allow me to explore new areas before starting up the english teaching.

    My guess is that I would be making the move from Egypt early in the new year, which presumably would make it harder to get jobs.

    If you have any suggestions of areas or anything else, or dog friendly living situations that go with teaching english, I would love to hear from you as it would help my confidence about the move!!!!!

    Thank you Barry,
    Amy 🙂

    Post a Reply
  15. i forgot to say, i am also interested in teaching very little ones, although my TEFL teacher was saying this would probably have to be in a mix of older students as well – some classes older students, some classes young ones.

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  16. Hi Amy,

    Thanks for the comment. Great choice to come over to Spain, especially with your dog. I actually bought Pepa here so there was no trouble flying her in, but I understand that it's important to find the right place for you and her.

    To be absolutely honest I have no idea where to suggest. I would have said Granada as it's the only place down in Andalucia that I know has mountains. I love Cazalla de la Sierra and Aracena, but they are small villages in hills, not really mountains. Is it definitely mountains you're after or just the countryside? The problem is most of the language schools are in the cities.

    I just had a quick look on wikipedia, maybe this link will give you an idea of some places: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Mountains_of_Andalusia.

    Hope that helps, good luck.

    Post a Reply
  17. Hi Barry, just had to ask question as I like your blog and your dogs name ! I live in Spain. I tutor currently Spanish people in English conversation. This is becoming very lucrative for me and I would like a qualification to put in my file. I do not want to teach in schools, so I was wondering if the first level qualification would be sufficient. I could do the weekend course or online. Would the certificate for this be recognised though ? I would have thought it would be fine wouldn't it ? I know I could carry on as I am, as my working life was in Sales Training, so teaching and instructing does come naturally to me. But, I would also like a paper qualification should I begin to have bigger classes [at the moment I do one to one in their home] to put on the wall !! Any advice much appreciated. By the way, I am Events and Publicity organiser for P.E.P.A. a charity for abandoned animals in Spain, hence connection with your dog ! I live on a mountain, overlooking the orange groves out to the sea and yes it is a wonderful life in Spain. I totally agree with you. Look forward to your advice

    Post a Reply
  18. Hi Jaine,

    Thanks for your mail. So sorry for the late reply, been manic studying for a DELTA. Re your question, an online or weekend would be fine if it's just for your students. They wouldn't know what a CELTA is anyway 😉 You can try i-to-i (see the top of this blog) who do decent on line courses.

    Great name for your organisation haha. Where are you based then?

    Thanks

    Barry

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  19. Hi Barry, thanks for the reply. I started the i-to-i course last week. I have put a bespoke package together in order to cover what I feel I need, as I won't be doing classroom teaching in schools etc. So I am doing a Business Module, One to One and Young Learners along with Grammar. I am hoping to complete this successfully, but, since starting the course I seem to be getting more and more students and am running out of free time to study !!! The course seems fine, but, I may have misjudged my abilities in some ways as if I am totally honest some of the terminology is alien to me, but, I suppose it is just a matter of doing my research and maybe not putting so much pressure on myself, I am sure I can do this, but, there is still the nagging self doubt I always get !!! I live in the mountains above Tavernes de La Valldigna which is about 30 mins away from Valencia on the coast towards Denia. It is wonderful here and I do love my life, especially as I am now getting so busy with my new career !!! Thanks Jaine good luck with your studying by the way, it doesn't come easy to me at my time in life but, I will get there in the end. !

    Post a Reply
  20. Hey Jaine,

    Good for you, how's the course then? The terminology is always a bit alien, I'm still learning stuff after 10 years, there's always something else round the corner. It's a nightmare to be honest, who'd be an English student?

    Sounds as if you have it good up in Valencia. Glad to hear you're enjoying it. If you need any help then let me know.

    Good luck

    Barry

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  21. Hi Barry,

    I’ve been researching ESL in Andalusia and your name has been coming up a lot. I appreciate that you’re very busy (especially with DELTA!), but would be very grateful if you could take a few moments to field a couple of questions.

    I’m a university educated and CELTA qualified teacher from the UK with one year of experience working in a South Korean public high school. I recently visited Sevilla/Malaga and decided that’s definitely where I want to make my next move.

    You’ve wrote about getting a job on arrival, but do you recommend anything before arriving in Spain? In particular, I’m talking about sending my CV and cover letter to the DoS as each school. Is there anything else that would give me an advantage?

    Secondly, ELI sounds like a great language school and I’d especially like to have an opportunity to work for them. When exactly do they begin hiring? You mentioned May, but is that in person or do they accept out-of-country applicants as well? I’ve been told to arrive mid-September, but if ELI begin earlier then I’d like to be there for that.

    Thanks for taking the time to read my email and I look forward to hearing back from you,

    Ron

    Post a Reply
  22. Hey Ron,

    How's it going? So my name came up a lot, that's good I guess.

    Yeah I'd definitely try to get a job beforehand if you can. A lot of academies do interviews on skype now for the start of September, or you can even pop over for an interview. Start sending your CV now to the DOS of each of the main academies: British Institute, Click, Link, English One, English school of Macarena. There are new ones popping up so do a google search.

    We will start hiring from early next week. If you send me an email, bazventure@yahoo.co.uk, I'll send you the contact details for HR.

    You have the right qualifications and experience to work for us so it might be a goer…but I don't make those decisions. Yeah we start on the 16 of September this year.

    Why did you decide on Sevilla or Malaga? If I had the choice now I'd go for Malaga if you like the beach, Sevilla is a great place to live, but when it gets hot you really notice. Depends what you want.

    Anyway, send me that mail. Good luck.

    Baz

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  23. Hi Barry,

    What a great blog….fab!!!

    Just wondering how you find getting by on a TEFL wage in Seville. I was originally looking into moving to Madrid, but fear I won't find it easy wage-wise.

    Also, are there any academies in Seville that cater primarily for adult students? It seems that most TEFL ads are for jobs with young learners as far as I can see.

    Thanks a lot.

    Siobhan

    Post a Reply
  24. Hey Siobhan,

    Thanks for writing. Yeah it's tricky at times. I do extra classes and am now an oral examiner to keep the money coming in. In Madrid it is a lot more expensive and I don't think you earn all that much more. Depends on your circumstances though. My wife is out of work and we have a kid and just about survive.

    Most jobs are with young learners yes, that's the bulk of the business at the moment.

    What do you want to do?

    Cheers

    Barry

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